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Residential Air Quality Resources

Residential air quality systems are a great way to keep your home comfortable. When you choose the right system, you promote a healthy indoor environment, maximize efficiency and save money.

Indoor Air Quality Money-Saving Tips

  • Purchase the correct system for your needs: Air quality systems include air purifiers, ventilation equipment, humidifiers and dehumidifiers. Purchasing the correct system not only means buying one that meets the needs of your household, but also purchasing one that’s the right size.
  • Dehumidify to save money: Dehumidifiers make muggy air feel more comfortable. They may also improve your A/C’s performance. During the summer, a dehumidifier might make it possible to not need to lower the temperature as much. Depending on the room temperature, you might not even need to use the A/C if you run the dehumidifier.
  • Use the right HVAC filter: It might be tempting to replace your HVAC system’s standard air filter for one with a better rating. Doing so can block the flow of air going into your system, making it less efficient and increasing wear and tear.
  • Use plants: The NASA Clean Air Study found that plants such as peace lilies, chrysanthemum, red-edged dracaena, bamboo palm and English ivy worked as natural air filters.

Residential Air Quality System Buying Guide

  • Conduct an air quality evaluation: Hire an expert to conduct an evaluation to determine exactly how you can improve the quality of indoor air so you purchase the correct type of system.
  • Know your airflow restrictions: Before installing an integrated air filtration equipment for your HVAC system, the specialist should be aware of the system’s airflow restrictions.
  • Correct placement: Learn where an air quality system needs to be installed to ensure there’s sufficient space for proper airflow and enough room for the components.
  • Consider features for your needs: Air quality components often offer features to make maintaining the health of your home simple. These include filter replacement indicators, adjustable fan speeds, pre-filters, programmable timers, remote controls, and monitoring equipment.

Keeping Your Indoor Air Quality System EfficientMaintenance of Indoor Air Systems

  • Keep the vents in your home clear
  • Schedule regular maintenance for your HVAC and air quality systems
  • Regularly change the air filters in your HVAC and air quality systems

Indoor Air Quality FAQs

Isn’t the air in my home safer than the air outside?

The concentration of pollutants in a home can be up to five times higher than outdoor concentrations, even in the most polluted cities.

How do I know if the quality of air in my home is compromised?

The best way to determine if you have poor indoor air quality is with a professional evaluation. If your home seems more humid or dusty than normal, or members of the household have cold- or allergy-like symptoms, it’s a good idea to have the air tested.

Can radon affect the quality of air in my home?

Yes. Radon is an invisible, scentless radioactive gas that occurs naturally. The only way to know if your home has it is with a radon testing kit.

What else lowers the quality of air in my home?

  • Odors
  • Stale air
  • Humidity
  • Chemicals
  • Microscopic insects
  • Mold
  • Gas
  • Gas-emitting chemicals
  • Air fresheners
  • Pollen
  • Dust
  • Viruses
  • Lead
  • Asbestos

Download our quick-reference checklist to ensure your home has high-quality indoor air:  4 Tips to Improve Your Home's Indoor Air Quality (0 downloads)

Get expert help for all your air quality questions by contacting AAA Heating and Cooling today.

 

Residential Air Quality Links

NADCA: National Air Duct Cleaners Association

Membership in NADCA is restricted to companies that can meet rigorous pre-qualification criteria.

ACCA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America

The Air Conditioning Contractors of America helps contractors acquire, serve and satisfy their customers.

American Lung Association — Indoor Air Quality

This site contains many pages dealing with a variety of air quality issues.

EPA’s Indoor Air Quality Home Page

Environmental Protection Agency’s Indoor Environment Division’s homepage containing many different topics including safety in different types of buildings.

EPA’s IAQ Hotlines

Lists indoor air quality hotline numbers with a description for each of them.

Environmental Health Laboratory Branch: Indoor Air Quality

California Dept. of Health Services homepage. Has a listing of their publications as well as a links page to other indoor air quality websites.

Health House – Indoor Air Quality

A quality site that contains, among other things, information about household items that cause air quality problems, health hazards, and homebuilding tips.

EPA Indoor Air Quality & Mold Resources

A major concern associated with exposure to biological pollutants is allergic reactions, which range from rhinitis to nasal congestion.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Online

A website dedicated to the study and treatment of allergic diseases. Contains a physician referral directory, a larger resource center and more.

The Fungus Among Us

Mold is a common fungus that can be found almost anywhere. Children’s playhouses, sheds, bathtubs, sinks, basements and more; mold has the ability to grow in many different areas. Mold occurs where there are water leaks, and can also appear because of humidity or from flooding problems.

American Industrial Hygiene Association

Home of several publications, as well as many other types of services.

National Air Filtration Association

The importance of air filtration, seminar presentations in PowerPoint format, information on becoming a NAFA certified air filter specialist and the NAFA Clean Air Award.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

Ask the Allergist section, Kids and Teens information, information for health professionals, plus a resource catalog.